• Joseph Caryl on the book of Job

    JOSEPH CARYL’S QUOTATIONS: from a Topics module in Power BibleCD

    Successful Families

    A family well visited and ordered is usually a prosperous family. ~ Joseph Caryl

    Knowing God

    The knowledge of God cometh down from God. We know him when he makes himself known to us, and usually he doth not make his fulness known to us till we make our emptiness known to him.  ~ Joseph Caryl

    Godly Teachers

    God hath not made his ministers lions to scare his flock, nor bulls to gore them, but shepherds to feed them and watch over them.  ~ Joseph Caryl

    Different Values

    As it is the spirit of sinfulness to delight in sin, so it is the spirit of godliness to delight in God. ~ Joseph Caryl

    The Holy Spirit

    As it is the office of Christ to intercede for us with God, so it is the office of the Holy Ghost to make those intercessions in us which we put up to God. ~ Joseph Caryl

    True Repentance

    Jesus Christ came to save us from our sins, not to save us in our sins.  ~ Joseph Caryl

    Idleness?

    Adam was not put into that pleasant garden only to take his pleasure and to eat the fruit of it, but to dress it and keep it.       ~ Joseph Caryl

    Selections above are taken from the 12 volume EXPOSITION, WITH PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS published (1648-1666) on the book of Job by Joseph Caryl.

    He was born in London 1602 and educated in Exeter College.  A learned Nonconformist minister, he preached to the Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn and later at St. Magnus, near London Bridge.  He died in February 1673.  His commentary on Job was taken from his sermons, and ran to four or five thousand pages of fine print.  Long out of print and hard to find, the huge commentary has recently been reprinted

    “He gives us much, but none too much.” –  Spurgeon in Commenting and Commentaries.

    The quotations were taken from Seed Thoughts, selections from Caryl’s commentary by Rev. J.E. Rockwell D.D. and reprinted by the Presbyterian Board of Publication in 1869

     

     

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